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Finding Closure: Navigating the Emotional Journey of Grieving the Relationship with Your Mother



Grief is an emotional experience that can be overwhelming and complex. You can grieve a physical loss of a loved one, loss of a relationship, or expectations. Grieving is a natural response to any significant loss, and it can be especially challenging to navigate. The pain, confusion, and heartache can be intense, and it's normal to feel lost and unsure of how to move forward. This is especially true when the loss is the relationship with your mother. Maybe you have come to terms with the fact that your mom cannot provide you with what you need or maybe your mom was an abuser. Whatever the precedent of your loss of this relationship, this article will help you to explore some of the common challenges that come with coping with the loss of the relationship with your mother, and provide tips and strategies to help you navigate this difficult time.


Understanding grief and its complexities


Grief is a complex and multifaceted experience. It is a natural reaction to any significant loss, and it can manifest in a variety of ways. Grief can be emotional, physical, and even spiritual. It can affect your thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. It can be overwhelming and can come in waves, making it difficult to predict when you'll feel the intensity of your emotions.


When coping with the loss of the relationship with your mother, it's important to understand that grief is not a linear process. There is no timeline for how long it will take to heal, and there is no 'right' way to grieve. Everyone experiences grief differently, and it's important to allow yourself the time and space to process your emotions in your own way. This is especially difficult when the person you grieve is still alive and you are making the conscious choice to no longer be an active part of their life and vice-versa.


Coping with the loss of the relationship with your mother


Coping with the loss of the relationship with your mother can be challenging, especially if you were close your mother (or what you deemed to be close). It's important to remember that your grief is valid, regardless of your relationship with the person.


One of the most challenging aspects of coping with the loss of the relationship with your mother is that it can bring up feelings of abandonment. Your mother may continue to have close relationships with other members of your family, but things with you are non-existent.


It's important to allow yourself to feel your emotions without judgment. It is also important to remember that no one else has experienced your mother the way that you have, siblings included. Your experience is unique to you, and it is valid. Whether you're feeling angry, sad, confused, or a combination of emotions, it's okay to feel what you're feeling. It's also important to remember that your emotions may fluctuate and change over time, and that's normal.


Common emotions experienced during the loss of the relationship with your mother


When coping with the loss of the relationship with your mother, it's common to experience a range of emotions. Some of the most common emotions experienced during grief include:

  • Sadness

  • Anger

  • Guilt

  • Anxiety

  • Depression

  • Loneliness

These emotions can be overwhelming and can come in waves.


On the other side of the grief you may also experience:

  • Peace of mind

  • Contentment

It's important to allow yourself to feel your emotions without judgment and to seek support if you need it.


The importance of talking about your feelings


Talking about your feelings can be an essential part of the grieving process. It can be helpful to talk to a friend, family member, or therapist about what you're going through. Sharing your emotions with others can help you feel less alone and can provide a sense of validation.


If you're having trouble talking about your feelings, consider writing them down in a journal. Writing can be a therapeutic way to process your emotions and can provide a sense of release.


Accepting the reality of the loss


Accepting the reality of the loss of this maternal relationship can be one of the most challenging aspects of the grieving process. It can be difficult to come to terms with the fact that the relationship that you once had with you mother is no longer serving you or your mother is an individual that breeds toxicity so ending the relationship with them is what is best for your and/or your family.


One way to help accept the reality of the loss is to radically accept your mother for who she is without fighting the reality of what the evidence is showing you about her. Another way is to let go of expectations that will never become a reality. For example: maybe you need to accept the fact that your mother lacks basic emotional intelligence, so her response to you wanting to discuss your trauma will always result in her gaslighting you or getting defensive.


Creating a support system


Creating a support system can be an essential part of coping with the loss of the relationship with your mother. This can include friends, family members, or a therapist. It's important to seek support from people who will listen without judgment and who will offer comfort and validation.


If you're having trouble finding a support system, consider joining a support group for people who are experiencing the same things. These groups can provide a sense of community and can help you feel less alone in your grief, but be careful not to trauma bond.


Self-care during the grieving process


Self-care is essential during this process. It's important to take care of your physical, emotional, and spiritual needs. This can include:

  • Eating nutritious foods

  • Getting enough sleep

  • Exercising regularly

  • Practicing relaxation techniques, such as meditation or deep breathing

  • Engaging in activities that bring you joy, such as reading, painting, or spending time in nature

  • Seeking professional help for grief counseling


Coping mechanisms for dealing with the loss of the relationship with your mother


There are many coping mechanisms that can help you deal with the grief of lose the relationship with your mother. Some of these include:

  • Practicing self-compassion

  • Learning stress-management techniques, such as mindfulness or yoga

  • Seeking out activities that promote relaxation, such as taking a warm bath or going for a walk

  • Engaging in creative outlets, such as writing or painting

  • Expressing your emotions through movement, such as dancing or yoga

  • Volunteering or doing something kind for others


Seeking professional help for counseling


If you're struggling to cope with the loss of the relationship with your mother, it may be helpful to seek professional help for counseling. A therapist can provide a safe and supportive space to process your emotions and can offer guidance on how to move forward. They can help you navigate the trauma of your childhood and the intricacies of what led you to make the decision to no longer engage in a relationship with your mother.


There are many different types of therapy that can be helpful for this type of grief (considering that we are grieving the loss of a relationship and not a life), including cognitive-behavioral therapy, mindfulness-based therapy, and grief counseling. It's important to find a therapist who specializes in childhood trauma or relationships with maternal figures and who you feel comfortable working with.


Conclusion: Moving forward through the loss of the relationship with your mother


Coping with the loss of the relationship with your mother can be challenging, but it's important to remember that healing is possible. It's normal to experience a range of emotions during the grieving process, and it's important to allow yourself to feel your emotions without judgment.


Creating a support system, practicing self-care, and seeking professional help when needed can all be helpful strategies for coping with grief. Remember that healing takes time, and it's important to be patient and compassionate with yourself as you navigate the complexities of this type of grief.

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